The Cloverfield Paradox (2018)

One suspects in the future, when people talk about The Cloverfield Paradox, they may wonder if the title was intentionally ironic. The paradox of Julius Onah’s picture doesn’t lie in the alternate realities or particle accelerators in space that its plot propagates, rather in quite how unsuccessfully a promising spec script was ported into the burgeoning Cloverfield universe, hashed up, delayed, re-written, re-shot, and then thrown onto Netflix after the Super Bowl with, literally, around two hours notice. That story is undoubtedly more remarkable than anything in the film itself.

Let’s backtrack. In early 2008, JJ Abrams’ production house Bad Robot dropped, equally out of nowhere, the original Cloverfield. Directed by friend and collaborator Matt Reeves, who has since gone on to make quite the name for himself with the Dawn and War For the Planet of the Apes (and potentially soon The Batman), Cloverfield took everyone by surprise. Abrams, fresh off huge TV success with Lost and breaking into cinema with Mission Impossible III, managed to fuse together the en vogue found footage sub-genre with a modern day, Hollywood take on Toho, reimagining a Godzilla-esque monster ramping through New York for a post-911, burgeoning social media American audience. Punchy, frothy and deft, Cloverfield just *worked*.

Understandably, it also left people wanting more. Abrams & Reeves left just enough clues as to a wider universe to make fans salivate; a blink and you’ll miss it (literally) suggestion the monster came from outer space, for one thing. The point of that story didn’t involve answers—it was about average Joe characters thrown into a scenario equivalent to a terrorist attack, essentially—but the idea answers may point to a broader mythology left many hoping Abrams and his collaborators would follow it up. Though it took almost a decade, in 2016, again almost out of nowhere, 10 Cloverfield Lane arrived in cinemas with a more recognisable cast (including a great John Goodman performance) and a narrative which made one thing clear: the Cloverfield universe was playing by different rules.

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War For the Planet of the Apes (2017)

There’s an almost laugh out loud moment in War For the Planet of the Apes in which several of our simian heroes, traversing a tunnel underneath a massive, fortified Army mountain base, find scrawled graffiti on the wall which reads ‘Ape-ocalypse Now’. The laughter doesn’t just come from the bad pun but how, frankly, that could have been an alternate title in a much sillier world.

War For the Planet of the Apes is about both the death of humanity but also the death of the American Dream. This is exemplified through the character of The Colonel, played with quiet steel masking hardened swagger by Woody Harrelson, who is a not so veiled homage to Marlon Brando’s Colonel Kurtz in Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now; he’s bald, he’s a stone cold military man, he has an almost hypnotic power of his troops and he’s very much gone off the reservation. The Colonel captures the madness of war, and the fear behind knowing you’ve essentially lost it.

After the critical and commercial success of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Matt Reeves was swiftly recruited by 20th Century Fox alongside returning writers Rick Jaffa & Amanda Silver to continue and in many senses conclude the Apes saga began in Rupert Wyatt’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes in 2011. While the series could continue beyond War, by the end you honestly wonder if it should. Sure, this could very easily lead into the original Planet of the Apes remade, but what would be the point? What story is left to tell? This feels like the definitive exploration of man vs ape as a complete trilogy.

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Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014)

If Rise of the Planet of the Apes was about the hubris of man bringing on its own self-destruction, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes switches the gears to focus much more heavily on ape society, and how unwitting leader of their new civilisation Caesar can rule and govern a world alongside what’s left of humanity.

Following the critical and commercial success of Rise in 2011, it was expected that Rupert Wyatt would continue and develop the story of Caesar (Andy Serkis) and the rising planet of the apes into the almost inevitable sequel. The plan between he and producer Rick Jaffa was to build back toward the story of the 1968 original Charlton Heston movie, in which his lone surviving astronaut ultimately finds himself on a future, post-apocalyptic Earth which apekind have inherited; indeed in Rise we see the launch of the Icarus, the very same space mission to Mars, more than suggesting we were heading back to a probable remake of Planet of the Apes – ignoring Tim Burton’s poor 2001 attempt.

Suddenly, Wyatt left the project late in 2012 when 20th Century Fox’s planned release date of May 2014 was deemed far too close to write, produce and direct what was already announced as Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, especially considering the sheer amount of CGI work needed to put Caesar and his world on screen. Matt Reeves, still riding the success of sort-of indie, sort-of found footage, sort-of blockbuster Cloverfield in 2008 and at that point developing a Twilight Zone feature remake, was drafted in as his replacement. Reeves very much took the ideas Wyatt laid down in Rise and evolved them in a way one suspects differently from how Wyatt himself would have gone.

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