Alias

Alias – Color Blind (1×07)

The continuing evolution of Alias across its first season is increasingly paralleled, as it should be, by the evolution and development of protagonist Sydney Bristow, as Color-Blind again returns to the central theme of not understanding or knowing who you truly are, growing lost within yourself deep inside a world with no clear delineation of black and white, or right and wrong. What Roberto Orci & Alex Kurtzman’s second script for the series does, and Alias does for the first time, is frame Sydney’s character journey through that of a guest character.

One of the difficulties in serialised storytelling to the degree Alias has deployed thus far is that it does not particularly encourage the use of the main guest character. TV shows of old, traditional series which tell a contained episodic story and move on, often framed a one-off character as key to the story being told that week. Murder mystery series, such as Murder, She Wrote or Diagnosis Murder, cop shows such as Law & Order or CSI, even science-fiction series such as the Star Trek spin-offs of the 1990’s and shows such as The X-Files, all of them frequently utilised a major guest character to weave a narrative around. With a serialised show telling an ongoing tale, it becomes a lot harder to stop and anchor a story around someone the audience doesn’t care about, and who’ll be gone next week.

Martin Shepard, who we briefly saw played by John Hannah in Reckoning previously, does not entirely anchor everything in Color-Blind but this is unquestionably the first episode of Alias to give a character who is not one of the main cast ensemble an arc of some fashion; in this case, Shepard being reminded of his tragic past as a brainwashed assassin who ended up killing Syd’s fiancee on the programmed order of SD-6, and his journey toward finding some escape and peace from that. The reason it works, and Alias is able to do it, is precisely because it factors into Syd’s psychology along the way. Shepard is a character in his own right but his existence is designed to sketch in more aspects of who Syd is, and her own journey in accepting Danny’s death.

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Alias

Alias – ‘A Broken Heart’ (1×04)

MICHAEL VAUGHN: In this job you see darkness; you see the worst in people. And though the jobs are different and the missions change and the enemies have a thousand names, the one crucial thing, the one real responsibility you have is to not let your rage and your resentment and your disgust darken you.

As we emerge from the initial phase of establishing the central concept of Alias, A Broken Heart continues developing the relationships between Sydney Bristow and our central collection of characters. While the least important and arguably most throwaway episode of the first season so far, Vanessa Taylor’s script nonetheless has several key interactions and narrative points which give the episode a purpose, and further suggest that Alias’ approach to ongoing, serialised storytelling means this won’t be a traditional 22-episodes marked by too many points of ‘filler’.

Not every episode of Alias has too deep a clear emotional or thematic through line, but A Broken Heart quite clearly is all about broken relationships, or relationships which are in danger of shattering. The title itself is a rather pointed pun with a double-meaning; ostensibly it suggests the climactic beat of the episode, in which Syd witnesses a bunch of Euro-terrorists place a small but hugely powerful bomb in the pacemaker of a UN diplomat, but it also rather directly refers to Sydney’s emotional state, and to some degree that of her father Jack Bristow. Both of them have suffered the trauma of losing the people they loved to sudden and rather violent deaths, and both of them have had their hearts ‘broken’ in the process. It becomes clearer that while Syd is trying to repair her damage, Jack’s may well be irreparable.

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Alias

Alias – ‘Parity’ (1×03)

ANNA ESPINOSA: I heard about your fiancé. Very sad. I thought perhaps it was a security execution sanctioned by your employer. Maybe you said something in your sleep you shouldn’t have. But then why would you be here in service for the men that killed your true love?

If Alias, in its opening two introductory episodes, flirted with the idea that the show is a post-Cold War espionage thriller attempting to understand and resolve the consequences of the 20th century’s longest-running and defining ideological conflict, then Parity absolutely goes for broke and seals the deal with a loving kiss. 

The third episode, the first not penned directly by series creator J.J. Abrams, cements and solidifies existing, introductory concepts and brings in key new ones which will help frame Alias as a show with a sense of unique, genre identity. In many respects, Alex Kurtzman-Counter (as he was named originally, before losing the Counter) and Roberto Orci’s script is one of the most crucial in Alias’ first season. It is the first episode which directly picks up from the cliffhanger established in the previous episode. It introduces one of the most interesting (and underused) characters the show ever gave us. And, most importantly, it truly kickstarts the mythology Alias would embrace, grapple with, struggle with, and never truly satisfy its audience with over the next five years. Parity is a key, early touchstone for Abrams’ series.

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Star Trek: The Original Series

Star Trek: The Original Series – ‘Spock’s World’

In an attempt to try and tackle the onerous job of looking into the Star Trek book universe, thanks to the help of Memory Beta’s chronology section, I am intending to look at the saga in book form from stories which take place earliest in the franchise’s timeline onwards. This hopefully should provide an illuminating and unusual way of examining the extended Star Trek universe.

Part of this story takes place 5 billion years ago.

It feels an unexpectedly timely moment to read ‘Spock’s World’, one of the signature novels from Star Trek writer Diane Duane. Though written in 1989, it deals with an issue that resonates for anyone living in the United Kingdom today, as this writer does: a Referendum. A decision on the part of Vulcan as to whether or not to secede from the United Federation of Planets. Duane could not have possibly known her novel would strike a chord in this way, but it turns out to be a happy accident.

Vulcan, in many respects, has remained more of an enigma in Star Trek than it by any rights should have. While The Next Generation explored the Klingon race and culture in depth, as did Deep Space Nine, only prequel series Enterprise truly delved into the first alien civilisation Gene Roddenberry presented in The Original Series as important to the human experience, through the character of Spock. The Vulcans evolved into a species known for their control of emotions, living through principles of logic and reason, as a direct counterpoint to the rash, hotheadedness innate in the human race. Enterprise, certainly in its first few seasons, made this central difference in both cultures a crucial aspect of the entire series, with the first Starfleet warp ship preparing to explore beyond Earth’s solar system, despite warnings from the Vulcans that humanity was ‘not ready’.

‘Spock’s World’ was written over a decade before Enterprise was even conceived, indeed it debuted only a couple of years into The Next Generation-era. For millions of viewers, Star Trek was *still* at its core Kirk, Spock, McCoy and the crew of the original Enterprise, with TOS the yardstick to follow. Duane’s story takes place just after The Motion Picture; Kirk is an Admiral who takes a temporary devolution in rank to become Captain of the Enterprise once again. TOS *did* explore Vulcan society, principally in legendary Season 2 premiere ‘Amok Time’ which introduced the Vulcan physical and psychological ritual of pon farr, but that classic series never truly was concerned with backstory and mythology of worlds and societies as the TNG-era began to explore. Vulcan always, still, remained a mystery.

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