New Podcast Guest Appearance: Trek FM’s Standard Orbit – ‘TOS Season 0.5’

Hosted by Zach Moore, Ken Tripp and Hayley Stoddart, Standard Orbit is part of the Trek FM podcast network and dedicated to covering all aspects of the original 1960’s series, Star Trek.

With the recent arrival of the second season of Star Trek: Discovery, which heavily featured elements of The Original Series including key characters, Zach and I discuss my assertion that Discovery S2 is essentially ‘TOS Season 0.5’, picking through the characters, narratives and unpicking where they do and don’t work.

Anyone with an interest in Discovery, or Star Trek broadly, you’ll find plenty to enjoy here.

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Star Trek: The Q Conflict (#1)

Tie-in fiction loves a good crossover event and Star Trek, in particular, is full of them.

Outside of recent Trek crossovers with Planet of the Apes, Transformers and Green Lantern, IDW Publishing most recently have tied into Star Trek: Discovery‘s narrative trends with a heavy focus on the Mirror Universe (particularly the untold on TV story of The Next Generation side of the Mirror coin) and now The Original Series with the newly launched Year Five, but The Q Conflict is a different animal. It is the kind of story that could only take place in tie-in continuity for a variety of reasons, and more specifically the comic as opposed to the novel. It feels mostly in step with Doctor Who events such as The Two Doctors, The Three Doctors or The Day of the Doctor; tying together in this case the legendary Starfleet Captains and crews across the four most popular Star Trek series from the last 50 years.

The Q Conflict is, consequently, a huge gimmick which hinges on the excitement of seeing Kirk, Picard, Sisko and Janeway, and key members of their crews, working together. How long that gimmick may last is open to question.

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Star Trek: Year Five (#1)

As tie-in comic series go, Star Trek: Year Five is about as prestige as you can get.

IDW Publishing have tapped into an area explored fairly widely in the tie-in novel world over the years – the original Captain James T. Kirk-led five year mission of exploration of The Original Series. There is an alternate universe out there somewhere where Gene Roddenberry’s groundbreaking series was never cancelled in 1969 after three seasons, and aired for the fourth and fifth year’s of the USS Enterprise’s voyage to seek out new life and new civilisations. Year Five is attempting to capture, on the page, that never seen 1970-1971 season of television – unless you count The Animated Series which purports to be the final two years but is questionable in terms of canon. IDW gave us a Year Four comic over a decade ago but this is only a spiritual sequel, running with the concept of the last year of Kirk’s mission.

The result, even in this first introductory issue, is exciting and fertile ground.

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Star Trek: Waypoint (Special 2019)

By definition, the Star Trek: Waypoint specials are fairly hit and miss in their anthological approach to the Star Trek universe, telling stories which fit in the greater lexicon without contradicting canon. Eschewing Discovery and Enterprise, this latest special focuses on the remaining four series in crafting a short story for each show at different points in their timeline.

The easiest way to report on these tales is to take them story by story, paragraph by paragraph.

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Plugging Gaps: How backstory is *becoming* story

Remember the time that backstory was just that? Backstory.

Many of the most successful TV shows and movies are specifically built on a sense of their own mythology and world building. Game of Thrones has a series of vast novels to draw on which detail an incredibly complicated social and political eco-system, for example. Backstory, the details of the universes of these tales and the histories of many characters within the stories, provide the unseen depth and ballast to the tale we are being told, the tale we are invested in.

In recent years, however, the trend of this has begun to shift. Our biggest stories within popular culture are now becoming obsessed with backstory not just being developed to enable the narrative, they are instead *becoming* the narrative. Storytellers are actively attempting to try and ‘plug gaps’, for want of a better term, in continuity and canon, believing it seems that audiences are as obsessed with these minor details as the writers of these properties appear to be. We are losing the element of ambiguity, surprise and mystery.

We are losing backstory by exploring too much of it.

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Fandom, Star Trek: Discovery and its Dark Reflection

Talking about the second season of Star Trek: Discovery this year has been a difficult experience in places.

Not just because the recently concluded fourteen-episode run wasn’t a particularly good season of television—more on that here—but also thanks to the way some of the online Star Trek fandom have responded to criticism. It hasn’t been pretty for those who have suggested Season 2 might not be, at the very least, enjoyable. This I can say from experience. Before my wrap up piece, which itself has been greeted with some vitriol in certain Facebook quarters where it has been shared, I wrote the occasional episode review of Season 2 for my former website Set The Tape – specifically for the episodes Brother, An Obol for Charon and Project: Daedalus. All of these episodes I found problematic.

In sharing that opinion, I felt the full force of how troubling fandom can be.

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Oh, Brother! Star Trek: Discovery (Season 2)

If there is one criticism many fans would struggle to level at Season 2 of Star Trek: Discovery, it would be the classic “this is not Star Trek”.

You can understand, to a point, why some fans shouted that from the rooftops about Season 1. Bryan Fuller’s initial vision for Star Trek’s long awaited return to television alongside Alex Kurtzman resolutely set out to buck the storytelling trend you had come to expect from a franchise last on television at the tail end of a very different age. Season 1 was heavily serialised, darker, had a protagonist who had mutinied by the end of the second episode, didn’t even introduce the main ship until episode three, and had the ships Captain end up being the villain.

With hindsight, however, we never knew we had it so good with Season 1. Yes, it was a season compromised by behind the scenes complications, which may have resulted in the fractured balance of the Federation-Klingon War and Mirror Universe stories, but Season 1 pushed the boundaries of what we expected Star Trek to be. As the 90’s era wasn’t your Dad’s Star Trek, then Discovery was proving the 90’s *was* now your Dad’s Star Trek. It dropped the F-bomb. It went hard to starboard on serialisation. And it wasn’t afraid to craft protagonists like Michael Burnham or Saru (or naturally Gabriel Lorca) who were hard to like and who had to grow on us.

Season 2 in the wake of this spends fourteen episodes systematically undoing everything that made, or could have made, Discovery something special and unique. If Season 1 wasn’t Star Trek enough, then by Kahless, Season 2 absolutely was much “too Star Trek” from start to finish.

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